Many small businesses we consult with are aware of Google’s successful PPC (Pay Per Click) advertising system, AdWords, but, being unsure of how it works (and therefore if it would work for them), are put off trying it out.

On the surface AdWords does look complicated, and as a small business owner you may also fear it would be expensive. After all, paying to appear at the top of a Google SERP (Search Engine Results Page) must cost big bucks, right?

In fact, used correctly, Adwords can work for any size and type of business, and you’ll get a measurable return on your investment – an investment which doesn’t have to be as large as you might think!

Here at Dentons Digital we successfully run numerous AdWords campaigns for our small business clients. We take over the time and effort (in the form of setting up, monitoring and analysing campaigns) involved in PPC, and have proved time and again that this form of advertising is certainly worthwhile.

Have a look at how we helped, Roman Rod, a family run firm of drainage experts, improve their PPC campaign. 

 

If you run AdWords alongside excellent SEO and other optimised digital marketing resources, you have all the bases covered and can’t fail to notice the benefits when it comes to increased traffic and conversions.

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT?

 Simply put, AdWords ensures that when a Google user enters a search term allied to the keywords on your AdWords entry, your entry will be shown high on the list of search results.

You have no doubt noticed those entries at the top of the SERP page that feature a little icon showing the word AD inside a box? Those entries are appearing first because they are AdWords marketers who are paying per click.

Where the click comes in is if a user actually clicks on your entry – that is when you PPC (Pay Per Click).

If other advertisers have that same search term (which is more than likely the case) then you will bid against them for the highest position on the SERP. Google has various criteria that are taken into account when the bidding takes place – things like the relevance of your ad and landing page to the searcher. This gives you a “Quality Score” which is taken into account in the bidding, along with the amount you are prepared to pay per click.

All this, of course, takes place very quickly and automatically – the auction takes around 25 seconds, immediately after a searcher has entered his/her search term in Google. The criteria used include the Quality Score and the maximum bid and budget you included in your AdWords set up. If you have the winning bid, your entry will appear in the prime position on the SERP page. If you lose out, then you’ll be given a lower slot.

ADWORDS ADVANTAGES

Many of our clients have expressed the fear that Google searchers are unlikely to click on a paid result because it is blatantly an advert, and that will put them off. They will prefer to aim for the organic search results further down the page.

This, research has shown, is not the case – around half of searchers don’t even realise that AdWords are paid adverts, and most still generally click on the highest placed search results.

For you, the advertiser, the benefits of using AdWords are many.

The results of AdWords can be measured concisely using a huge array of metrics, so it is quickly apparent whether the campaign is successful or needs adjusting. An AdWords campaign is also scalable – if things are going well you can increase your spend, and your leads will increase exponentially.

Another beauty of AdWords is that ads can be customised to finely target the audience you want, including their location, type of device, and even the time of day you want them to see your ad.

If you aren’t using AdWords to promote your business, you can bet your most successful competitors in the market are! (Why not Google them and see?).

 If you’d like Dentons Digital to get stuck into making your mark with Google AdWords give Dan or Daryl a call on . They’ll happily run you through the ins and outs of PPC and explain how the process can bring you more business.